FW15 JASON WU

Picture 3 of 3

Jason Wu dazzled in shades of dried herb.

While the arrival of autumn in Hawai‘i is subtle and gentle, the season brings sudden changes in the world of fashion: a flurry of fresh looks, new lines and revamped accessories. The size of Vogue’s September issue highlights the importance of this season, as the fashion world offers a fresh canvas for expression. Time to shed the denim shorts and striped tank you have been sweating in all summer.

Here in Honolulu, even as models traipse around in full suits made of brocade, it can be hard to sink into most of fall’s new trends. But there is one way we can participate in the excitement of fall fashion: color. A new top, bag, skirt or stiletto in an unexpected hue will invoke possibilities that a crisp autumn day in New York City can bring.

This year’s fall colors are alluring, romantic and glamorous, while at the same time accessible, wearable and even grounding. The blue-gray colors—named by Pantone as “Stormy Weather” and “Reflecting Pond”—are deep and rich, making a bold, confident statement. Whether in a tailored, cropped blazer or a Lela Rose gown, these moody hues shine and excite like the descending indigo sky of an early fall sunset.

Marsala, the Pantone color of 2015, builds on the romantic wonderment of spring and summer’s Bohemian trend. A few notable examples include Alexander McQueen’s bell-sleeve, leather mini dress, Altuzarra’s thigh-high, lace-up boots, and my personal favorite take on the color—Zimmerman’s diaphanous flowing gown, fit for nostalgic celebrations and times past.

Earthy neutral tones, such as the warm olive “Dried Herb” and cool, soft “Desert Sage,” evoke peace and tranquility, complementing fall browns and blacks with a soft, wholesome touch. Whether in a silk blouse or bomber jacket by Phillip Lim, this palette brings us all back down to earth. New and fresh, yet also rooted in autumn’s bounty of dramatic transformations, these inviting shades of the moment are a perfect avenue to express a seasonal shift, no matter how subtle it may be in our Hawai‘i.