The newest ways to experience multimedia technology

Audio, video and information dissemination have entered a new decade, and the technology industry has leaped ahead dramatically to create multidimensional ways to experience sights and sounds. This spring, two devices aim to fully immerse users in the delivery of two long-sought electronic goals: authentic, lifelike acoustics and integrative portable multimedia.

800 Series Diamond Speakers

John Bowers, founder of audio company Bowers & Wilkins, set out with a goal to create an audio device that replicates an audio signal as authentically as possible. The brand’s recently released 800 Series shows how closely Bowers has come to fulfilling that mission.

Featuring diamond dome tweeters with a quad-magnet design, the 800 Series provides a stable and exceptionally open frame of sound. Bass performance rocks with a dual magnet motor system – with neodymium magnets, harmonic distortion is reduced. Oxygen-free copper speaker terminals and capacitors made of silver, gold and oil establish the thoughtful discernment of Bowers & Wilkins’ engineers in selecting key materials for the best acoustic output possible.

Bowers & Wilkins 800 Series speakers are designed for the home, but also have been used in the famous Abbey Road Studios in London and Skywalker Sound studio in California.

The 800 Diamond model, at $24,000, is Bowers & Wilkins’ top-of-the-line offering. For more information, visit www.bowers-wilkins.com.

iPad

A lot of buzz has surrounded the latest invention from Apple. The iPad joins the growing field of electronics dedicated to streamlining a myriad of tasks into a single, compact, on-the-go device.

“iPad creates and defines an entirely new category of devices that will connect users with their apps and content in a much more intimate, intuitive and fun way than ever before,” said Apple CEO Steve Jobs upon the product’s unveiling earlier this year.

Like its predecessor, the iPhone, Apple’s iPad allows users to surf the Web, check e-mail, watch videos, store music and play games on a convenient touch screen interface. However, the iPad, with a larger 9.7-inch LED backlit display, takes content one step further by integrating e-books and 12 new apps specially designed for the device.

While more than 140,000 apps are currently available in Apple’s App Store, the story of interest lies in a new crop of apps being developed to add a totally different dimension to print’s most content-rich medium: magazines. The Wonderfactory, a New York-based multimedia company, is at work on a prototype app for Sports Illustrated. The magazine’s usual box scores, game recaps and team and player profiles will be integrated in the app with exclusively shot game footage, interactive graphics and information-upon-information tabs. Apple has created the iPad to be the perfect platform for more cross-media endeavors like the app being developed by The Wonderfactory – magazine houses such as Conde Nast have already announced plans to create integrative apps for its major titles, including an app for GQ‘s April issue, and the June issues of Vanity Fair and Wired.

The iPad will be available in Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi + 3G models starting in April.