One bishop’s past became another family’s treasure.

If you are a long-time kama’aina, you may know this house as the “Bishop’s Residence.” Built on the slope of Diamond Head in 1940, the home was at one point owned by the Catholic Church, housing John Scanlan, the Irish-born Bishop of Honolulu from 1968 to 1981. The home’s current owner, Jim Growney, once served as Scanlan’s altar boy at the age of 10 while attending Mission Dolores School in San Francisco.”The Bishop’s Residence is anchored in the present but harks [back] to an era when owners shared a love of open spaces and gracious outdoor living,” says Growney.

Jim and his wife Priscilla, who are now retired after years of running their own public-relations and advertising firm in Honolulu, have lived in the home since 2006 and have listed it for sale through LIST Sotheby’s International Realty. “[The home] reflects a gracious style of Hawaiian living that is virtually impossible to duplicate on the bustling island of O’ahu,” says Jim.

The Growneys have filled the seven-bedroom, 8,426-square-foot home with an art collection, which includes a major piece by New York artist Jason Rolfe.

They cite the home’s historic garden and spectacular views as the elements that made them choose the home.

“The house rests on a slight promontory that overlooks an astonishing vista. It starts with an unobstructed view of the ocean, sweeps past Waikiki’s high-rise hotels, crosses houses clinging to the sides of steep valleys and finally rises up to the mist-covered mountains. Come nightfall, the vista becomes a stage set of glittering lights and frequent fireworks displays.”

“This house and the surrounding garden reminds us of the homes in Honolulu when we were growing up as children and later as young adults,” says Jim. “It is the embodiment of everything that made old Hawai’i so unique and magnificent.”

For more information on 3735 Diamond Head Circle, please call Mary Worrall at LIST Sotheby’s International Realty, 228-8825.