Looking Back

On the first floor of Halekulani along the promenade next to House Without A Key, you'll find a gallery space housing the Hawai'i premiere of the exhibition, Photographs of Hawaii—Where Tradewinds Blow, featuring works by Caroline Haskins Gurrey and A. R. Gurrey Jr. from the private collection of Mark and Carolyn Blackburn.

On the first floor of Halekulani along the promenade next to House Without A Key, you’ll find a gallery space housing the Hawai’i premiere of the exhibition, Photographs of Hawaii—Where Tradewinds Blow, featuring works by Caroline Haskins Gurrey and A. R. Gurrey Jr. from the private collection of Mark and Carolyn Blackburn. This exhibit of historic photographs looks back at Hawai’i and its people at the beginning of the 20th century through two different and unique styles and subject matter. Caroline Haskins Gurrey (1869-1927) was a portrait photographer, and on display are her commissioned images of  young Hawaiians called “Types of Hawaiian Youth” that would be displayed at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. Her subjects were students from Kamehameha Schools. Her husband, Alfred Richard (A. R.) Gurrey Jr. (1874-1928) was a pioneer of surf photography, and he was one of the first to photograph surfers at the Waikiki break called “Threes.” In order to get close to his subjects, Gurrey worked with outrigger canoe paddlers, who put him in the right spot ahead of the surfers on the waves. Together, their images of Hawai’i’s people and landscape captured and preserved a time of life in Honolulu before development, and a part of history and culture that is now in the past.

Open daily 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., free

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