The BAMP Project gives the gift of music to Hawai’i.

People respond to music. It speaks to people,” says matty hazelgrove, bamp project’s co-founder.

Founded in February 2005 to “build a thriving musical and cultural community in the islands,” BAMP is a premier concert production, promotion and event company that captures Hawai’i hearts-and ears-through music.


Born from a group of music lovers’ desire to “throw a few shows,” BAMP has grown into a synched enterprise of four full-time employees, dozens of volunteers and an average one or more shows a week in large Honolulu locales or its concert venue, The Republik-a sleek lounge located at 1349 Kapi’olani Blvd.

BAMP brought superior talent, such as Thirty Seconds to Mars, No Doubt and The National to Hawai’i, and now has a star-studded lineup, including indie front-runner Rebelution, arranged this summer.

With an electrifying one-year anniversary at The Republik-including a stellar performance by Empire of the Sun, an LED wall and vivid light show- BAMP is far from playing its final note.

When not packing concert houses, Hazelgrove channels prior club promotions experience into harmonious efforts with fellow music enthusiasts Philip Pendleton, primary talent buyer, and Flash Hansen, marketing and promotions director, to find artists, research viable market trends, production elements, launch promotions and book music and comedy acts for the Hawai’i market.

“We had a goal, and we went after it,” says Hazelgrove, who “always wanted to do shows,” and after moving to Hawai’i, longed for concerts similar to those he experienced on the mainland. “BAMP is the outcome of that goal.”

“We have a product that everyone loves; music inspires people,” Hansen says. “People are always asking what we’re doing; it makes our jobs easier.”

Despite applause from local concertgoers, BAMP’s productions are not without challenges. Every show is not prosperous, however, the company’s mission is not to make a large profit but to expose Hawai’i to great music.

“Our goal was not to make money. With music, there was an emotional tie. We are all passionate about music and wanted to share that with Hawai’i,” Pendleton says.

Expenses and distance, inevitable booking obstacles to bringing sizable acts to the islands, are viewed as positive opportunities to showcase local talent. Being in Hawai’i enables BAMP to expose volunteers and artisans to professional experiences they wouldn’t have in larger metropolises.

“Fostering the local music scene is very important,” Hansen says. “We can’t always book the big acts, but we can develop talent we have here … BAMP is more about the kids and curating their love for music.”

Hansen notes that BAMP experienced exponential growth since The Republik opened in July 2012, a sign that Hawai’i’s concert zest can only boom.

“We’ve achieved our goal of having our own venue [The Republik],” Hazelgrove says. “Now, we aim to continue to grow,” Pendleton adds.

As long as there is an island-wide demand for music, BAMP will beat on.

For more information about BAMP Project and The Republik, visit www.bampproject.com and www. jointherepublik.com.