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Logan, along with his family (dad Jerry, mom Kim and sister Lily), helped pass “Anaya’s Law” that requires medical insurance companies to cover surgeries to repair orofacial anomalies, like the one that he was born with.

After years of surgeries and treatments, Logan Virtudazo puts his best face forward.

Logan Virtudazo, had a team at Kapi‘olani Medical Center professionals before he was even born.

“We found out Logan had a cleft when I was 18 weeks pregnant … ” says mom Kim Virtudazo. She, and husband Jerry, were worried about what the diagnosis would mean for their baby boy’s future.

They began working with Kapi‘olani Medical Center for Women & Children when she was about six months pregnant. “We met with Dr. Lynn Iwamoto, who shared with us what the process and the surgeries were like,” Kim says. “She explained what the next 18-plus years would be like. Dr. Iwamoto told us about the Cleft and Craniofacial Clinic and their mission. She also introduced us to the Lifetime of Smiles support group. After meeting Dr. Iwamoto and meeting the support group, we were better prepared to meet Logan.”

With those supports in place, baby Logan was born. However, it was dis- covered that his cleft was more severe that they had anticipated. “…We learned Logan would not only have a cleft lip but a cleft palate as well,” Kim recalls. “Along with that, Logan has a gap in his gum and a nonfunctioning nostril. These things ended up being more than just a ‘cosmetic’ issue.”

Logan went on to have three surgeries before he was seven years old. His most recent surgery was this past March, when he was six years old. It was a big one: a bone grafting surgery that took part of his hipbone to place into his gum line. The recovery for this last surgery was the most difficult due to special diet required during the month following the surgery.

Kim credits the Cleft and Craniofa- cial Clinic for preparing the family and supporting them through these years of surgeries and treatments. The Lifetime of Smiles support group—along with Logan’s Aunty Khanh, who helps care for Logan—with ensuring their post-surgery experience “wasn’t horrible.”

She says that Logan’s visits with Megan Yee at Child Life really helped ease any anxieties he may have had before the surgeries. Meeting in the playroom, Yee explained the surgery to Logan and what to expect during recovery.

Logan, who recently celebrated his seventh birthday, is an active boy who loves going to the beach and movies with his family—which also includes his sister Lily. He and Lily also recently started playing soccer.

The Virtudazos, along with other similarly affected families, worked with Cleft and Craniofacial RN, Eileen Matsumoto to pass “Anaya’s Law” that requires medical insurance companies to cover surgeries to repair orofacial anomalies, like the one that Logan had. “Logan attended legislative hearings with me,” Kim says.

“Kapi‘olani has helped Logan and our family in ways we could never fully explain,” Kim says. “Kapi‘olani really looks at the whole child, not just the medical needs of the child. The com- prehensive approach of the Cleft and Craniofacial Clinic has made it easy for us as first-time parents, especially for a parent of a child with special needs.”


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